How to Get Rid of Boxelder Bugs

Boxelder ButControlling the Boxelder bug once it has entered you house is very simply you will simply need to vacuum them up, same basically with Lady bugs.  They are accidental guest looking for worth from the winter.We do not recommend and chemical measures once they are inside.

Homeowners that have a constant problem with boxelder bugs or lady bugs year after year should use a chemical method on the exterior to prevent them from entering the structure at all.  Prevention methods are best done in the fall time.

To prevent boxelder bugscluster flieslady bugs and similar pests from entering in the fall, outdoor, fast-acting synthetic pyrethroids such as the ones listed below are recommended:

We Recommend these chemicals when you are trying to get rid of Boxelder bugs:

Cyonara

Demon WP

Tempo SC

Tempo WP

Getting Rid of Boxelder BugsYou will want to spray the Pyretrin of choice around all the eaves, attic vents, windows, doors, under-fascia lips, soffits, siding(including under lips) and any other possible points of entry, concentrating on the south and the southwest sides.

Sealing the box elder bugs out by caulking cracks and around openings, repair broken window screens and door jams, plugging cracks in the foundation or roof as well as similar exclusion-type activities will help prevent the lady beetles and boxelder bugs from entering the structure.

A Great Article on the Boxelder bug and control methods provided by the Extension Service at the University of Minnesota. Covers all aspects of the life cycle of the boxelder bug and also control recommendations.

Boxelder bugs, Boisea trivittatus, are familiar insects to most people. They are generally not noticed during summer, but often can become an issue when they try to move into homes during fall as they search for overwintering sites

Boxelder bugs are common pests over much of the United States. Adults are about 1/2 inch long.They are bright red or black with narrow reddish lines on the back.

Boxelder bugs feed principally by sucking juices from the boxelder tree, but are sometimes found on other plants.

They do very little damage to the trees they attack, but at certain times of the year they can become a nuisance. Boxelder bugs develop by gradual metamorphosis, from egg, to nymph, then to adult.

When boxelder bugs build up to large populations and invade a home they are usually pests only by their presence, although their piercing-sucking mouthparts can sometimes puncture skin, causing slight irritation. Box elder bugs do very little damage to the trees they attack, but at certain times of the year they can become a nuisance. Boxelder bugs develop by gradual metamorphosis, from egg, to nymph, then to adult.

Adult boxelder bugs will enter structures int he fall, seeking winter shelter.

They seek shelter in protected places such as houses and other buildings, cracks or crevices in walls, doors, under windows and around foundations, particularly on south and west exposures.

Boxelder bugs can come out even during the dead of winter when it is cold outside and the sun is shining.

They will then emerge in the spring to seek out host trees on which to feed and lay eggs.

These insects feed on the softer plant tissues, including leaves, flowers, and new twigs. Unless the population is exceptionally large, the damage to plants is minimal. During years when their population soars, they can damage useful shade trees.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boisea_trivittata

The boxelder bug overwinters as an adult in protected places such as houses and other buildings, in cracks or crevices in walls, doors, under windows and around foundations, particularly on south and west exposures. In the spring when tree buds open, females lay small, red eggs on leaves and stones and in cracks and crevices in the bark of female boxelder trees. The eggs later hatch into young nymphs that are wingless and bright red with some black markings. These young bugs usually are found on low vegetation near boxelder trees until seeds are formed on the tree, on which they start to feed.

http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/insect/05522.html

http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn74114.html

Monica Bird (926 Posts)

Monica’s compassion for her customer's struggles with pest control issues and passion for pest control stems from over 10 years in the industry. With a master’s degree in entomology, she uses her knowledge and experience in chemistry, insects and pests to educate her customers.


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